See how these kids celebrated Hogbetsotso Festival (PHOTOS)

See how these kids celebrated Hogbetsotso Festival (PHOTOS)

The 2018 Hogbetsotso Za (Festival) which ended today with a "Thanks Giving Servies" is an amazing display of the people of Anlo's rich and great cultu

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The 2018 Hogbetsotso Za (Festival) which ended today with a “Thanks Giving Servies” is an amazing display of the people of Anlo’s rich and great cultural heritage from the Volta Region. If you think the one week-long event is only for the elderly to showcase what is Anlo and Hogbetsotso Za is made up of, then you are definitely mistaken.

The kids and school children had a full day for themselves to prove to the elderly that indeed they are those that will take over the mantle of leadership from them and have therefore taken to the streets of Anloga to display what they are truly made up of as the children of Anlo Land.

See some amazing photos:

Hogbetsotso Za in brief:

Hogbetsotso Festival is celebrated by the people of Anlo in the Volta Region of Ghana. The celebration starts in the month of November at Anloga, which is the traditional and ritual capital of the Anlo state. Festival is a day that unfolds Ewe history and brings to play the memories of legendary exodus and heroic acts of men of boldness and their mystical powers that liberated the Ewe-Dogbo people from the rule of tyrant King of Kings Torgbui Agorkorli of Nortsie in Togo.

The event brings together all the chiefs and elders of Anlo-land at a colourful durbar to mark the annual event in the Volta Region.

‘HOGBETSOTSO’ is derived from the word ‘HOGBE’ or ‘HOHOGBE’ the day of exodus, the moment in time when the Ewes in the Dogbo quarter of the walled city of Nortsie in Togo.

According to historians, the original home of all Ewes of which the Anlo people form part, is traced traditionally to Oyo in Western Nigeria from where they migrated to their present country in the seventeenth century. There is ample evidence to prove that the Ewes stayed in Nigeria. Cultural traits of the Yoruba people can be traced among the Ewes of Anlo which is clearly evidenced in musical forms.